Following how students from age 7 to 16 use their experiences when developing their ideas about transformations of matter

Lena Löfgren, Gustav Helldén

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

In this paper we present results from a 10 year longitudinal study with the aim to investigate how students use experiences when they develop their ideas about decomposition, burning, evaporation, and condensation. The theoretical framework of this study builds upon social constructivist perspectives. In our study (1997-2006) we have followed 23 students all born in 1990. We have conducted interviews allowing the students to explain the transformation of matter in fading leaves left lying on the ground, burning candles, and a glass of water with a lid on. Most students make progress in describing and explaining the situations in the first years of the study. Then there is a vast spread in the students’ capability to use their experiences and science taught in school in productive ways to improve their understanding of transformations of matter. We discuss the implications for science education research, compulsory school science curricula, and school science education out of these findings.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Event9th Nordic Research Symposium on Science Educatio, June 11-14, 2008, Reykjavik, Iceland -
Duration: 1980-Jan-01 → …

Conference

Conference9th Nordic Research Symposium on Science Educatio, June 11-14, 2008, Reykjavik, Iceland
Period80-01-01 → …

Swedish Standard Keywords

  • Didactics (50302)

Keywords

  • longitudinal study
  • primary education
  • science learning
  • secondary education
  • the particulate nature of matter
  • transformations of matter

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Following how students from age 7 to 16 use their experiences when developing their ideas about transformations of matter'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this